The Frida Cinema

The only fully functioning Art House Cinema in Orange County.

www.thefridacinema.org
scottlava:

“They’re all mistakes, children! Filthy, nasty things. Glad I never was one.”

scottlava:

They’re all mistakes, children! Filthy, nasty things. Glad I never was one.”

theplaylistfilm:

Watch: 3-Minute Supercut Retrospectives Commemorating Best Picture Oscar Winners Of 1980s, 1990s, and 2000s
Miguel Branco has put together three minute supercuts highlighting the Best Picture Oscar winners from the 1980s, 1990s, and 2000s. Take a look at the full videos below, and let us know if these winners still stand the test of time, or if you would have chosen differently.

theplaylistfilm:

Watch: 3-Minute Supercut Retrospectives Commemorating Best Picture Oscar Winners Of 1980s, 1990s, and 2000s

Miguel Branco has put together three minute supercuts highlighting the Best Picture Oscar winners from the 1980s, 1990s, and 2000s. Take a look at the full videos below, and let us know if these winners still stand the test of time, or if you would have chosen differently.

thedissolve:

“This tension between past and present, and between the conventions of the stage and film, comes to a head in the film’s best, brightest, boldest musical number, “Wig In A Box.” Occurring almost exactly at the film’s midway point, “Wig In A Box” is when the Hedwig/Hansel of the past gives way to the Hedwig who’s been our guide through this story. It’s also, notably, the only song in Hedwig not performed in front of an audience of at least one, the only song that departs from the real-world construct of live performance and gives into the fantasy construct of movie musicals. This is the moment when Hedwig finds a way to disengage from her past by diving into fantasy, and when Hedwig dances on the line separating live theater and film.”

Our Movie Of The Week discussion of John Cameron Mitchell’s singular glam-rock musical Hedwig And The Angry Inch kicks off with Genevieve Koski’s Keynote on how the film manages the divide between its theatrical origins and cinematic ambition. [Read more…]

"Terrence Malick’s new film is a form of prayer. It created within me a spiritual awareness, and made me more alert to the awe of existence. It functions to pull us back from the distractions of the moment, and focus us on mystery and gratitude."

-Roger Ebert

(Source: terrymalicks, via motionpicturesatarevolution)